Words of the Day

Posted: December 7, 2016 in Culture and Faith, Things of Faith

While I have not been known to be a sesquipedalian, I am somewhat of a lexophile. Over the past several months of living in the alter-universe where, truth is detached from reality and created by opinionated perceptions distortedmanurehero into a perverted sense of the present, I had to smile at the way in which Pope Francis addressed the emerging post-truth culture. He cannot be accused of euphemizing his judgments.  His analysis of the current context he summed up with two words, “coprophilia” and “coprophagia.” A wonderfully colorful characterization of consumerism and news media. Apparently this was not the first time he had used these terms. However, it was the first time that I heard him use them.

The imagery these two terms conjure are graphically appropriate at a time when the populous is so voraciously devouring news (obviously this term no longer means what it used to) that it is out-pacing the media’s insatiable appetite to report anything (truth has no meaning here) that meets the tastes of consumers. What seems strikingly obvious is that this is but the natural result of a capitalist and consumerist oriented culture. How is it that we are surprised by these developments? What seems almost comical to me is the way in which of the (half or un)truths are being spread by those within a community who are said to worship the one who claims to be the “Truth.” The irony is as deep as the pile of feces being loved and consumed. How is it that we have moved from standing with Jesus and truth-telling to standing with Pilot asking “what is truth?”

truth-and-liesThe immediate problem (as I see it within the United States) predates this election cycle finding its roots in the early Twentieth Century as industrial and religious leaders became partners in the cultural experiment of creating the national religion of Christian Libertarianism.[1] This national religion sought to shape and create a culture in which capitalism, constitutionalism, and a spattering of religious (Judeo-Christian) values were mixed together with exceptionalism. This, however, is only part of the story. The immediate counterpart to this liberal conservativism is liberal progressivism which also shares a smattering of exceptionalism, religious (social) values, constitutionalism and capitalism. Interestingly enough both sides share an unhealthy affection for militarism. They are two sides of the same coin. In as much as they are different, they share many of the same fundamental values

Regardless of which side one identifies with, the underlying rhetoric used is that of fear. The language used has reached apocalyptic levels exalting the stakes so high as if the ultimate hope lies in an a political process or system. I’m not saying that organization and institutions are unnecessary or unimportant, but simply they are not the source of Christian hope. They do not hold the future and they are not what a follower of Jesus is to swear allegiance to. What has happened is that we have become so enmeshed in this culture and so much hyperbole has been used to push political agendas that the evangelical community has become consumers of half-truth and falsity. Like the pop-culture, the evangelical community finds itself asking, “What is truth?” I think it’s time to step away from the dung hill and find something more nutritious to consume. We all know the old adage “You are what you eat . . .”

[1] Kevin M. Kruse, One Nation Under God: How Corporate America Invented Christian America. (Basic Books: New York, 2015).

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